Monthly Archives: November 2013

The “Necessary” Evils of Politics

Daily, I sit and watch the talking heads on television slam the people with opposing views on the political spectrum. I get on social media and see more of the same. It’s all over the internet, television and radio. You can’t hide from it. 

However, in American politics, there is a balance that exists, although it may not seem that way when one’s opposing party is in power. As much as I despise the two party system that we currently have (and yes, it really is a two party system. You can argue that the Tea Party is a third party but they are nothing more than radical Republicans and “Independents” side with the highest bidder), the two party system IS a necessary evil. 

I say this because no one party expresses the complete concerns of every citizen in the United States. So, as much as we hate the fact that everyone should receive representation in the US government, it has to be this way. The reason being, if one single party, no matter which one it was, ruled this nation, completely, the US would be no different than those third world nations that are ruled by dictators, oppressing the people that have differing views. And, no one should be oppressed for their views. This nation was founded on the principal that differing views were a necessity. 

I say that to say this, however: I believe that what we need in the political arena isn’t a one party system, but a “Kill Switch” for political careers. Here’s what I mean. Any elected official is subject to scrutiny by the general public. When it comes to action against a political official, the general public is powerless, short of waiting around for election time and voting them out of office, which is also a founding principal of our government. The general public can also write or call their elected official and demand action, but those calls are mostly ignored. What I am proposing is a “Kill Switch”, a way for the general public to say, “Okay. We’ve had enough. Get out of office. Now!” 

Understandably, there would be ways to abuse such a power, so there would have to be guidelines in place to prevent outright idiocracy from controlling the career of an elected official. So, let’s say, for instance, the guidelines were:

1. The elected official’s approval rating fell below acceptable guidelines:

       -President – 40%

       – Senator -35%

       -Representative -45%

(I arrived at these numbers through NO scientific calculations. This is merely an example. I did, however, take into consideration that there are less Senators than Representatives and thus they represent a wider population, so there numbers should be lower. Again, this is just an example.)

2. For Senators and Representatives only: Has the elected official been present in chamber, for the majority of calculated hours, while their respected chamber was in session? 

(This has always been a big one for me. Most of these people get elected and then are rarely ever present. Don’t believe it? Flip on CSPAN sometime and count the number of people actually in either chamber debating the bills they want to make laws for the people to abide by.)

3. There must be a petition, signed and verified, by a majority of the population in the elected officials representative territory who are registered voters, calling for a special vote.

4. The elected official must be voted out of office by a majority vote.

5. There must be an immediate vote to replace Senators and Representatives. In the case of the President, the Vice President would take control for one year, during which time an election would be held for the office of President. 

So, something like this would be a good thing, right? Who can tell? Chances are, it will never happen. Until then, we have to live with the necessary evils that our founding fathers gave us. 

 

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